Cost of a Tear

Today a tear came to my eye,

Just one little tear, my want to cry.

It glittered like crystal as it grew in form,

A raindrop of emotion in a lifetime of storm.

What cost a tear,

Was price too dear?

Today a tear came to my eye,

A single reminder of things gone by.

Abundance of love, I once knew,

Shared of myself with only so few.

What cost a tear,

If liberate the self from what I did fear?

Today a tear came to my eye,

A memory I’ll keep until I die.

It spoke of a future built on the past,

A monument of tolerance – designed to last.

With bricks of forgiveness, and mortar of love,

It will soar to the heavens highest above.

All for the cost of a tear.  

Song of the Sunset Hawk

Soothing spring breeze,

Sweet kiss of magnolia adrift,

Muted colors of night descend,

Day yields to dreams of tomorrow.

Storm abates, cleansing, a mind dispels,

All thought of emptiness filled,

Yesterday now gone,

Repossessing its sorrow.

Midst forest sentinels, a way,

Rose pedals ‘neath unshod foot,

Gilt path traverses still water,

Moon bids Sun adieu.

Against lunar pale, silhouette soars,

Nature’s melody, lilt in the night

Vision of bright future, seen through Hawk eye

For love ever true, is what I seek for you.

It Was Not My Choice

From birth to death, we face myriad choices,

Do this, take that, disharmony of voices.

What child could learn, or man overcome,

Bedeviled by confusion from sun to sun?

A parent, a friend, relative or foe,

Appear to the weak, all others must know.

Yet into the world, free from their hold,

Each again faces “do as you’re told!”

A teacher, a boss, the cop on the corner,

All bow to their egos, none with clue warmer.

For fate is our Mistress, Karma her tool,

Discordance is manna, food of the fool.

Yet hope, like a candle, may lighten the night,

Guiding our fortunes, our futures soon bright.

From chaos emerging, comes loud, clear voice,

I fell in love with you, and it was not my choice.

For D C

Hawk Stone

A True Story of Mitakuye Oyasin

One afternoon, returning from an appointment, as I was driving west on Delmar Boulevard, close to Old Bonnehomme Road in Clayton, MO., a Red Tail hawk swooped down in front of the car ahead of me. This is not an uncommon occurrence in Missouri but for it to happen on a busy street at the beginning of rush hour was unusual. Unfortunately for the hawk, he was not careful enough to avoid the car and was struck.

The car that hit the hawk kept going as if nothing happened. As I got close enough, I stopped my car, out on the emergency lights and got out to see if there was anything I could do. Tragically, the injuries sustained by the hawk were massive, and he appeared to be dead.

Having work gloves in my car, along with small, plastic garbage bags, I set about picking the hawk up to transport him to the wild. As I slowly picked him up, one talon grabbed onto a flat stone and locked it in place. It was almost as though he was clinging to life but failed.

I tried to remove the stone, but it was as tough complete rigor mortis had rapidly set in, and I could not remove it. Taking this as a sign, I brought the body home and amputated both talons and a few feathers which I preserved. The remainder of the body, I took out to Creve Couer Park, near the Missouri River and returned it to the wild.

Since that day, I sense I have a connection to a power greater than myself.

I feel my eyes opened to the true meaning of Mitakuye Oyasin.

Living Mitakuye Oyasin

A true story.   

At the turn of the 21st Century, I received my Social Security Disability which allowed me to stop living on the streets and get a place. I found a furnished room with bath and carport (I had no car), in the Casa Grande no-tell Motel on Rte 66 (Watson Rd.) in suburban St. Louis. It wasn’t the Days Inn, but it was out of the weather. The rules didn’t allow cooking in the rooms, so I got a small grill and put it in the carport, there to enjoy my grande cuisine; also got a microwave and small coffee pot.

The motel still exists; it’s on a business strip, heavily trafficked with a small creek and wooded area in the rear; probably more like a drainage ditch. I suspected there were raccoons and possum back there, so, rather than throw away foods I couldn’t eat, I would place it in a small dish I secured on a low tree limb. It worked; miraculously, every night, the food disappeared. Lol.

What I also began to notice was raccoon paw prints in my carport, so I got dry dog food and a couple of plastic bowls from the dollar store and put it out there and the miracle of miracles, every night the food disappeared All that remained was soggy crumbs in the water bowl.

Slowly, as the raccoons and I got accustomed to each other, I would leave my room door open while sitting just inside; there to watch the action. To say the least, it got interesting. I had eight regular visitors and a couple of party crashers. I tried getting them to wear name tags, but they refused to be labeled.

On the perimeter of my carport was a concrete curb. The side away from my door had bushes where the raccoons had blazed a trail to the food dishes. Almost as soon as the sun started going down, they would appear; most heading towards the food but one occasionally marching right into my door and checking things out. Then one night, she sat at the top of the curb trying to climb down, but her front paws weren’t working.

As I watched her struggle, she would look at me cautiously as if to say, “Will you harm me?” Using my walking stick, I put some food on the end and slowly pushed it her way. She was hungry but couldn’t feed herself. It was then that I noticed that both of her front arms were broken so I walked closer and put food within her reach.

In the morning, I called a friend who worked with wild animals and told her the story. That afternoon, she brought over a trap, and we set it up. The next morning, there was my little friend waiting patiently, as if to say, “About damn time you got up!”

We took her to the rescue center vet who operated, repairing both arms. The vet stated it appeared she had attempted to climb into a dumpster when the heavy open top flew over and smashed her arms before she could avoid it. I think the operation took about six hours. When done, the vet said he wasn’t sure it was going to work, but hoped so.  He kept her for a few days of observation then released her to my friend who would nurse her. She also paid the $ 6,000.00 vet bill.

Following about four weeks of recovery, she was fit enough to leave so we took her back home and released her. She stayed close then one night didn’t come. She was gone for maybe four weeks when she suddenly reappeared at my door with four little ones in tow. They walked up to me as if to say “Hi, gramps, we’re home.” No fear, no anger just as if they always belonged.

It was a reminder that Mitakuye Oyasin is real.

A Taste At Sunset

Sunset nigh, a time to reflect.

Memories abound, an orphan tear.

What souls well met, did hearts conspire,

To seek of love, bereft of fear.

Alone you sit, your scent transcends,

Lingering taste, of kiss sublime.

Supple lips, accord of desire,

Hearts entwine, to last for all time.

With thoughts empowered, no folly be known,

Our bodies tremble neath setting sun.

The universe ablaze, each breath a prayer,

Enjoined in love, we unite as one.

Hush Sweet Smile

On a day without sun,

Night’s pall moon did forsake.

No forest sprite nor soul to see,

Alone, forlorn courage doth quake.

Assailed by visions, old pain oft lingers,

Tears of shame, burden without merit.

Journey’s toll, an ember rebelling,

Cautious pace, renewing the spirit.

With vibrant heart, to brave steep path,

Arise a Phoenix, in beauty abound.

The battle yours, your foes but shades,

Remove foul mask, let a smile resound.

Curse not the world that was before,

Don hushed sweet smile, as you pass out hell’s door.